Gender and educational achievement

At GCSE girls tend to do better in the majority of subjects:

Gender and educational achievement

{dialog-heading}

Received Mar 28; Accepted Jun This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract This study examined whether different aspects of self-regulation i.

Gender and educational achievement

Specifically, we investigated whether higher school achievement by girls in comparison to boys can be explained by self-regulation.

German and mathematics achievement were assessed in a sample of 53 German fifth graders 19 boys, 34 girls using formal academic performance tests i. Age and intelligence CFT R were included as control variables.

Analyses of mean differences showed that girls outperformed boys in German achievement and behavior regulation.

Regression analyses, using a bootstrapping method, revealed that relations between gender and German achievement were mediated by behavior regulation. Furthermore, we found a suppression effect of behavior regulation on the relation between gender and mathematics achievement: We discuss these results from a developmental perspective and within the theoretical framework of self-regulation and achievement.

Several studies have found significant gender differences in school achievement favoring girls over boys Cole, ; Duckworth and Seligman, According to the German census, there are more girls than boys in higher secondary schools, whereas more boys than girls attend lower secondary schools.

As a consequence, more girls achieve the general qualification for university entrance, whereas more boys complete the certificate of lower secondary school Statistisches Bundesamt, The reasons for these gender differences in school achievement have not been clarified yet.

Past research has shown that besides cognitive abilities e. In line with these findings, previous studies have indicated that specific components of self-regulation—behavioral regulation or self-regulated learning—could contribute to gender differences in school achievement Duckworth and Seligman, ; Kuhl and Hannover, However, by only investigating behavior regulation, these previous studies neglected the wider conceptualization of self-regulation.

The concept of self-regulation includes both behavior regulation and emotion regulation, and both aspects of self-regulation may be related to children's school achievement Blair, ; Calkins, ; McClelland et al.

Gender and educational achievement

Therefore, it is important to understand the contribution of behavior and emotion regulation to gender differences in school achievement. In the present study, we investigated in a sample of German fifth graders who had just transitioned from primary school to secondary school whether self-regulation mediates effects of gender on school achievement.

In particular, we studied the relations between different aspects of self-regulation i. Gender differences in school achievement Past research suggested that girls are in general more successful in school than boys. Hartley and Sutton have recently reported that especially boys develop gender stereotypes according to which girls are perceived as academically superior with regard to motivation, ability, performance, and self-regulation.

However, previous studies revealed rather inconsistent results concerning gender differences in different domains of school achievement. In the present study, we focused on achievement in German and mathematics because performance in these subjects is seen as an important aspect of school achievement Schrader and Helmke, Previous large-scale studies revealed higher German achievement by girls in comparison to boys Stanat and Kunter, ; Stanat et al.

However, the picture of gender differences in mathematics achievement is less clear Hannover and Kessels, ; Stanat et al. While in some studies boys exceeded girls in mathematics achievement, in other studies no gender differences in mathematics achievement were found Hannover and Kessels, For instance, Machin and Pekkarinen argued that mixed evidence for gender differences in school achievement could be explained in part by a higher variance of boys' in comparison to girls' school achievement.

As Hyde pointed out, meta-analyses have consistently shown that there are no significant gender differences in general cognitive abilities. Thus, although cognitive abilities are significantly and positively related to school achievement, they cannot explain gender differences in school achievement Spinath et al.by Sam Cook a former student Until s the underachievement of girls was the major concern however since s girls started to outperform boys in all areas of the education system.

At GCSE girls tend to do better in the majority of subjects: 64% of girls and % of boys achieved 5+ A*-C GCSEs or. Gender inequalities in education – in terms of systematic variations in access to educational institutions, in competencies, school marks, and educational certificates along the axis of gender – have tremendously changed over the course of.

by Sam Cook a former student Until s the underachievement of girls was the major concern however since s girls started to outperform boys in all areas of the education system. At GCSE girls tend to do better in the majority of subjects: 64% of girls and % of boys achieved 5+ A*-C GCSEs or.

PPT for lesson on gender and educational achievement. Including T/F quiz used as starter/5(2). Home» Sociology» Education and Sociology» Gender and Educational Attainment.

Gender and Educational Attainment. Citation: C N Trueman "Gender and Educational Attainment" this could be an argument put forward as to why the gender achievement role started to become more accessible to women and the role eventually switched to females.

Jul 17,  · Currently, both scientific literature and German mass media are discussing the discrepancy in school achievement between boys and girls, going so far as to call boys the new losers of the educational system (Spiewak, , August 5).Several studies have found significant gender differences in school achievement favoring girls over boys (Cole, ; Duckworth and Seligman, .

Gender and Educational Attainment - History Learning Site